Historical Events ▶ Brands
Historical Events ▶ Brands

HE-1952-0150

Tony the Tiger

Who knows?

MMDE: Tony the Tiger has a black nose

Current: Tony the Tiger has a blue nose

Tony the Tiger: He's been around since 1952, his frosted flakes might have been Greeeeeaaaaat! but what colour was his nose? Many are saying it's only recently become a prominent blue, whereas they have a false memory of it being black - or is the Mandela Effect at play here?

Few people realise he was created as a result of a competition Kelloggs ran to find the official mascot for a brand-new breakfast cereal. Eugene Kolkey, already a well-known graphic artist, came up with the design, won the contest and he's been with us ever since.

Complete with his blue/black nose...

Historical Events ▶ Brands

HE-1986-0147

Staples

Has that staple always been right there in the logo?

MMDE: The Staples logo is all a regular font

Current: The Staples logo has a staple attached to its "L"

Some people are saying the Staples logo has changed and are claiming this is a Mandela Effect. References today show a styled staple on the "L" in the middle of their name, which is appropriate for their brand, but this seems to jump out as new to others.

Businesses, especially nationwides ones, invest millions in their brand. Every detail is carefully designed to give an immediate impression to their current and potential customers. They are very unlikely to tinker with it needlessley without a very good reason.

Nevertheless, this is being seriously discussed and is of real concern to those who feel there is more to this than just a false memory.

Historical Events ▶ Brands

HE-1852-0125

Vasoline

Rhymes with Gasoline

MMDE: Vasoline

Current: Vaseline

It's been around since 1852, but how exactly is the famous skin healing petroleum jelly spelt? If you thought Vasoline is correct, with an 'o' and not an 'e' as in Vaseline, it might not be a mere false memory - you might be experiencing a Mandela Effect.

It's original name was "Wonder Jelly" and was made as a by-product of the oil from sperm whales. The usual caution to such a long-established brand applies. These companies know full well the value of a name and would never tinker with it without a very good reason - they have invested considerable time and money into them, so the last thing they want is their customers having alternative memories of their brands.

Being very used to saying it in a way which rhymes with Gasoline might have affected the idea it is spelt the same way too, yet this seems odd as it's the kind of thing which stares people in the face each morning as they open their bathroom cabinet.

Historical Events ▶ Brands

HE-1973-0121

DEA

Tricky Dicky's legacy

MMDE: Drug Enforcement Agency

Current: Drug Enforcement Administration

Formed in 1973, the DEA has been the US government's most effective weapon in the war against drugs for decades. Many people, when asked what it stands for, will say the Drug Enforcement Agency, but it's never been called this, apparently it's always been the Drug Enforcement Administration.

Those experiencing this as a false memory are usually surprised to search the web and find most references show "Administration", but they can be forgiven when even some dictionary sites show both. One explanation could be the use of the word "Agency" for other government bodies, such as the CIA and the FAA, where it's always been "Agency". Officers of the DEA are also referred to as "Agents", as well.

Historical Events ▶ Brands

HE-1913-0118

Hellmanns Mayonaise

"Two l's two n's"

Current: Hellmann's Mayonnaise

MMDE: Helman's Mayonnaise

Founded in 1905 when Richard Hellmann emigrated from Vetschau, Germany to New York City and opened a delicatessen where he sold his home made mayonnaise, most households recognise this famous brand. It's for this reason the owners rarely change it once established -especially a change in spelling to the main name.

However, there is a Mass Memory Discrepancy Effect concerning this - how exactly was the famous mayonnaise brand spelled?

Some remember it differently to the way it's spelt today, but in different ways. Today we see "Hellmann's", but some remember various permutations such as "Helmann's", "Hellman's" or "Helman's". 

Historical Events ▶ Brands

HE-1957-0111

The river Kwai's bridge

What was the exact title of the film?

MMDE: The bridge over the river Kwai

Current: The bridge on the river Kwai

The famous 1951 movie featuring Alec Guinness, William Holden and Jack Hawkins as POWs in a Japanese camp building a bridge to cross the river Kwai was called "The Bridge over the river Kwai" only if you are experiencing an MMDE. That's because it's actual title today is seen as "The bridge on the river Kwai".

This catches many people. There is an interesting explanation, but since most of the people it affects would be totally unaware of this, it can probably be discounted. The film is based on the book called Le Pont de la Rivière Kwai, which translates to "The Bridge over the River Kwai", but not many would know of that. 

Historical Events ▶ Brands

HE-1851-0110

Fruit of the Loom

Missing the horn of plenty

MMDE: Logo had a cornucopia

Current: Logo has no cornucopia

Few people realise the famous "Fruit of the Loom" brand was established in 1851. Many are very familiar with it having worn their underwear at some point in their lives, but what exactly is on the logo?

If you remember a cornucopia - a horn with lots of colorful fruit pouring out of it - you may be experiencing an MMDE, because the logo today doesn't show one. 

There are many references to both versions on the internet. It seems to be an easy one to get those who have never heard of the Mandela Effect with, and are of a certain age, such as parents, who would certainly be familiar with the brand.

Historical Events ▶ Brands

HE-1936-0107

Blue Riband

Take the biscuit

Many people remember the biscuit which is today called the Blue Riband as being called the Blue Ribbon. This is even though it was called that from its origin in 1936 by Gray Dunn of Scotland, and has since been managed by Nestlé.

This particular MMDE became famous when the Daily Mail reported people as being in "shock" when news of its production was announced as being moved to Poland. This wasn't why they were suprised - it was because they "had been lied to" their whole life as they were sure it was called the Blue Ribbon bar.

Although the newspaper report has a mocking tone, this is a classic Mandela Effect and those who were being affected by it were not amused at all.

Historical Events ▶ Brands

HE-1811-0100

MacIntosh Apple

Was it the MacIntosh or the McIntosh Apple?

Current: McIntosh Apple

MMDE: MacIntosh Apple

The MacIntosh Apple is the national Apple of Canada, and was named in 1811, when John McIntosh discovered the unknown sapling on his farm and began cultivating and grafting the fruit from it.

Of course it's become famous for a different reason more recently, when the Apple computer company named a line of their desktops and later laptops after it - the "Apple MacIntosh".

Many people remember the spelling as "MacIntosh" all along, and there are many references to this to be found today. Are they experiencing a Mass Memory Discrepancy Effect as a simple result of people misspelling the actual fruit after having become so familiar with the computer?