Historical Events  Movies
Historical Events  Movies
Hitchcocks The Birds

The whites of their eyes

MMDE: 'The Birds' from 1963 was filmed in black and white

Current: 'The Birds' from 1963 was filmed in color

Here's another Mandela Effect, like The Fly, which is concerned with whether a movie was originally filmed in color or black and white. This time it's Hitchcock's 1963 thriller "The Birds".

Based on the 1952 Daphne Due Marier story of the same name, the movie shows a series of unexplained attacks by birds on a small, ordinary American town over a few days.

Many of the special effects were actually firsts, including a precursor to the green-screen technique used throughout the video and movie industries today.

Historical Events  Movies
Candyman

Say his name how many times?

MMDE: Say 'Candyman' 3 times

Current: Say 'Candyman' 5 times

Candyman was the 1992 movie in which all who saw him were certainly not about to receive a sweet treat.

Written by Clive Barker, from Hellraiser fame, it focuses on an urban legend which describes the summoning of an entity by saying his name a certain number of times in front of a mirror. The Mandela Effect here is that number, because whilst today it shows it was 5, many people are saying they remember it being 3.

Even weirder is that this is shown in the movie to be able to change, because at the end one character says "Helen" 4 times to summon a spirit.

Historical Events  Movies
Cats vs Dogs

The 2001 movie where cats fought dogs was called...?

MMDE: Cats vs Dogs

Current: Cats & Dogs

It is an epic battle that has been fought for thousands of years.

Brought to the big screen in 2001, the legendary tale of the ongoing war between otherwise cute-looking cats, and their friendly-looking (but that might be just an act) dogs was made into a movie, which saw a sequel in 2010.

Many remember the movie Cats vs Dogs, which showed just how much is going on in this battle which we mere humans are totally unaware of. The problem? That movie never existed.

The movie everyone is thinking of is called "Cats & Dogs", but it's remarkable how many are sure they see the "vs" in  mental image when they conjure up the movie poster.

Historical Events  Movies
The Bare Necessities

The Bare Necessities: "I couldn't be ____ of my big home"

MMDE: I couldn't be fonder of my big home

Current: I couldn't be found of my big home

The famous Jungle Book Disney movie from 1967 featured many memorable songs, arguably the most stand-out being "The Bare Necessities". There's a Mandela Effect around a line in it though:

Wherever I wander, wherever I roam
I couldn't be fonder of my big home

That's the way it's currently printed when you Google "bare necessities official lyrics". Yet listening to the original, it's clearly, even deliberately, sung as "I couldn't be found of my big home". Go ahead - it's at the 23 second mark here. The emphasis is very odd because it no longer rhymes, and of course turns the line into nonsense compared to the way everyone remembers it being before.

Historical Events  Movies
Inception

Inception: Hollywood's distinctive foghorn sound 

MMDE: "Inception" was the first movie the distinctive foghorn sound was in 

Current: The distinctive foghorn sound was not in the movie "Inception"

Everyone knows movies have stylistic trends. This goes back to the early days of cinema, when no comedy was complete unless someone's face received a generous helping of flying pie. Looking back, certain stylistic cliches can be spotted which almost date them. Your movie is set in a remote jungle? The opening sequence must have a low fly over shot. Your action thriller must have the hero being beaten up, and only winning through when all hope seems lost.

Technology plays a role too. Once some gimmick is tried once, and seen to catch on, it seems to be everywhere and usually gets it's name from the first time it was used. There's an example of this with the loud, dramatic, pounding, repeating sound that directors just can't seem to stay away from, and it's known affectionately as the "Inception Foghorn". The problem? It's not in the movie. At all.

Historical Events  Movies
Mickey Mouse Suspenders

What held up Mickey Mouse's trousers?

MMDE: Mickey Mouse wore suspenders

Current: Mickey Mouse did not wear suspenders

Mickey Mouse made his full debut in the classic Disney cartoon "Steamboat Willie" in 1928.

Appearing today as a shaky black and white quaint historical curiosity, it's causing a stir amongst many people who are pointing to something it shows as a Mandela Effect. That is - he has no suspenders. They are certain he used to use them to keep his trousers up.

People are reporting that he definitely had them, not only because they saw them but because they distinctly remember what he did with them.  They remember him snapping them in time with the music as he turned the wheel, strutted across the deck and whistled, etc.

Historical Events  Movies
Freddy Krueger

What color was it originally?

MMDE: Black and red

Current: Green and red

Is this a Mandela Effect or a squabble about who sees what color as what?

Freddy Krueger, the evil villain from from the 1984 horror movie "A Nightmare on Elm Street", was as famous for his razor glove as his loud striped sweater. Many remember this being black and red, but see it today as green and red. 

There may be more to this though. There are some instances where the same image can be seen differently by different people - for example, the famous "White and Gold or Blue and Black" dress. Now, imagine how hard things would get if you didn't have a single image like that, but just had to remember what it was like.