James Cagney
08 Oct 2019
Tiger Woods
03 Oct 2019
Tiger Woods
15 Sep 2019
Robert Mugabe
06 Sep 2019
Vikings Horns
04 Sep 2019
Buddha
03 Sep 2019
Fortune Cookies
02 Sep 2019
Quaker Oats
01 Sep 2019
Historical Events  Movies
Historical Events  Movies
The Bare Necessities

The Bare Necessities: "I couldn't be ____ of my big home"

MMDE: I couldn't be fonder of my big home

Current: I couldn't be found of my big home

The famous Jungle Book Disney movie from 1967 featured many memorable songs, arguably the most stand-out being "The Bare Necessities". There's a Mandela Effect around a line in it though:

Wherever I wander, wherever I roam
I couldn't be fonder of my big home

That's the way it's currently printed when you Google "bare necessities official lyrics". Yet listening to the original, it's clearly, even deliberately, sung as "I couldn't be found of my big home". Go ahead - it's at the 23 second mark here. The emphasis is very odd because it no longer rhymes, and of course turns the line into nonsense compared to the way everyone remembers it being before.

Historical Events  Movies
Inception

Inception: Hollywood's distinctive foghorn sound 

MMDE: "Inception" was the first movie the distinctive foghorn sound was in 

Current: The distinctive foghorn sound was not in the movie "Inception"

Everyone knows movies have stylistic trends. This goes back to the early days of cinema, when no comedy was complete unless someone's face received a generous helping of flying pie. Looking back, certain stylistic cliches can be spotted which almost date them. Your movie is set in a remote jungle? The opening sequence must have a low fly over shot. Your action thriller must have the hero being beaten up, and only winning through when all hope seems lost.

Technology plays a role too. Once some gimmick is tried once, and seen to catch on, it seems to be everywhere and usually gets it's name from the first time it was used. There's an example of this with the loud, dramatic, pounding, repeating sound that directors just can't seem to stay away from, and it's known affectionately as the "Inception Foghorn". The problem? It's not in the movie. At all.

Historical Events  Movies
Mickey Mouse Suspenders

What held up Mickey Mouse's trousers?

MMDE: Mickey Mouse wore suspenders

Current: Mickey Mouse did not wear suspenders

Mickey Mouse made his full debut in the classic Disney cartoon "Steamboat Willie" in 1928.

Appearing today as a shaky black and white quaint historical curiosity, it's causing a stir amongst many people who are pointing to something it shows as a Mandela Effect. That is - he has no suspenders. They are certain he used to use them to keep his trousers up.

People are reporting that he definitely had them, not only because they saw them but because they distinctly remember what he did with them.  They remember him snapping them in time with the music as he turned the wheel, strutted across the deck and whistled, etc.

Historical Events  Movies
Freddy Krueger

What color was it originally?

MMDE: Black and red

Current: Green and red

Is this a Mandela Effect or a squabble about who sees what color as what?

Freddy Krueger, the evil villain from from the 1984 horror movie "A Nightmare on Elm Street", was as famous for his razor glove as his loud striped sweater. Many remember this being black and red, but see it today as green and red. 

There may be more to this though. There are some instances where the same image can be seen differently by different people - for example, the famous "White and Gold or Blue and Black" dress. Now, imagine how hard things would get if you didn't have a single image like that, but just had to remember what it was like.

Historical Events  Movies
They Live

Was there an exclamation mark?

MMDE: Yes: They Live!

Current: No: They Live

Seems someone's all out of bubblegum.

The iconic 1988 movie "They Live" either did or didn't have an exclamation mark after it's title, and it's freaking out those who are sure it's changed.

References today show it's not present, but the MMDE affecting many show it was.

Often described as the ultimate conspiracy theory movie, it's ironic that it became the subject of one itself. The hero is never named, which is an allusion to him representing every "normal" person in the real world. The story follows his journey as he realises completely disguised aliens are living directly amongst us.

Historical Events  Movies
The Fly

The 1958 version: color or black and white?

MMDE: Black and white

Current: Color

First off, those experiencing this MMDE are well aware that TV's from the late 50's and 60's were black and white, so even though that's the knee-jerk explanation for this, it's not what they are saying. At that time, TV's themselves were still rare, so most would have seen the movie in the cinema anyway.

What they remember is the movie being in black and white, whereas today all references show it as always having been filmed in color.

There were posters and publicity shots which are in black and white, and are still easily searchable on the internet, which may have contributed to the idea it was not filmed in color.

Historical Events  Movies
Whatever happened to Baby Jane?

Pushed down the stairs

MMDE: Jane pushed Blanche down the stairs

Current: Jane did not push Blanche down the stairs

The 1962 psychological thriller "Whatever happened to Baby Jane?" contains some pretty disturbing scenes, where two faded Hollywood movie stars, who are sisters, live together in a large creepy mansion. Many people remember one of them tipping the other from her wheelchair down the stairs, and it's been referred to many times in pop culture since - for example, in The Simpsons.

The problem? This isn't in the movie, and those who remember it as being there are experiencing the Mandela Effect.

There is a part where Blanche falls off the bottom step whilst reaching for a phone, but there's no way this would be confused with the dramatic one many people swear was in the original.