Historical Events  Movies
Historical Events  Movies
Hanging Munchkin

Was it a bird, was it a Munchkin?

MMDE: A Munchkin actor hung himself on screen

Current: A Munchkin actor did not hang himself on screen

Another Wizard of Oz false memory?

Many people remember seeing something strange in the background hanging from a tree at the end of the Tin Man sequence. It looked like a Munchkin, and the story was this little fellow was one of the dwarf actors brought in who committed suicide after being rejected by another female dwarf who was also acting as a Munchkin.

The story gained prominence in an Irving Welsh play (yes, of "Trainspotting" fame) "Babylon Heights", which followed the livs of the real-life dwarfs recruited as Munchkin actors for the movie.

However the studio claims they brought in several large birds from a local zoo and allowed to wander around the fake forest, in order to give it a more realistic feel. Specifically, they claim it is a crane. Urban myth or alternative memory? You decide...

Historical Events  Movies
Casablanca

The most famous movie line ever?

Ask anyone unfamiliar with this MMDE to quote a line from Casablanca and odds on they'll instantly reply with 'Play it again, Sam'. You guessed it - that's not in the movie, and never has been.

Starring Humphrey Bogart and Ingrid Bergman, Casablanca (1942) consistently ranks near the top of the list of the greatest films ever made.

Similar to the Beam me up, Scotty and Me Tarzan, you Jane etc memes, this particular misconception seems to arise when a short, memorable quote to sum up a powerful image of the story as a whole was provided, and it's inclusion in the production isn't actually necessary. It's a kind of single-phrase summary which becomes so associated with the story it ends up getting a life of its own.

Historical Events  Movies
The river Kwai's bridge

What was the exact title of the film?

MMDE: The bridge over the river Kwai

Current: The bridge on the river Kwai

The famous 1951 movie featuring Alec Guinness, William Holden and Jack Hawkins as POWs in a Japanese camp building a bridge to cross the river Kwai was called "The Bridge over the river Kwai" only if you are experiencing an MMDE. That's because it's actual title today is seen as "The bridge on the river Kwai".

This catches many people out. There is an interesting explanation, but since most of the people it affects would be totally unaware of this, it can probably be discounted. The film is based on the book called Le Pont de la Rivière Kwai, which translates to "The Kwai River Bridge", but that doesn't help clear things up either way. 

Historical Events  Movies
Tweedledee and Tweedledum

Crazy headgear - but what was it exactly?

MMDE: Propellers on their hats

Current: Flags on their hats

Tweedledee and Tweedledum first appeared in a poem by John Byrom, but were made much more famous in Lewis Caroll's Through the Looking-Glass and what Alice Found There - which is of course better known as Alice in Wonderland.

In the Disney Movie of 1951, they clearly have yellow flags on their hats, yet many people remember them as having propellers. There are plenty of references to them on the internet today, including artwork and costumes. Alice in Wonderland is the subject of other MMDE's, which is hardly surprising given the craziness in her world...

Historical Events  Movies
Cheshire Cat

What did the Cheshire Cat say?

MMDE: We're all mad here

Current: Most everyone is mad here.

The mysterious Cheshire Cat is firmly lodged in many peoples memories having read about him, or equally likely seen him, in Lewis Carrols famous Alice in Wonderland.

In the Disney adaptation, many remember him saying "we're all mad here", and this phrase is referenced many times on the internet. It's this way in the original text, too. The problem is in the Disney movie, the phrase he uses is "Most everyone is mad here".

This Mass Memory Discrepancy Effect is likely explained by the phrase being different in the original, which is of course the authoritative source. However, it is remarkable just how many claim to have only seen the movie yet are sure they know the phrase.

Historical Events  Movies
Laurel and Hardy

Stan and Ollie are in a right old pickle again

MMDE: Another fine mess

Current: Another nice mess

Ask anyone unfamiliar with this Mandela Effect to quote Ollie's most famous catchphrase, and they'll probably respond with "Another Fine Mess".

In fact that's not what he said most of the time - it's actually "Another Nice Mess".

This MMDE is a little bit different though because of a huge clue suggesting both could be right. There was a film starring Laurel and Hardy actually called "Another Fine Mess". However, even there the "fine" version is said very rarely compared to the "nice" one.

This could be one which is somewhere between a "Beam Me Up Scotty" meme and an actual MMDE. There's clearly real evidence for both the minority and the majority memories, but it's the latter which is prevailing.

Historical Events  Movies
Houston we have a problem

In fact we have a double problem

MMDE: Houston, we have a problem

Current: Houston, we've had a problem

It's not often you come across a Mandela Effect as complicated as this one.

The issue is around the phrase "Houston, we have a problem".

It was first heard in 1970 in the audio recording of the moon mission of that year, when the astronauts were telling NASA about the explosion on their spacecraft. Some claim it was in fact "Houston, we've had a problem." So far so good ... but then the movie of this event, Apollo 13, was made in 1995 starring Tom Hanks, Ed Harris, Bill Paxton and Kevin Bacon. Some people are not only saying it changed in the movie but it actually changed back again - "flip flopped" - as it's been described. Then, some are claiming the original audio flip flopped too.

It's an iconic phrase to which many references can easily be found. Plus, it's our old friend Tom Hanks featuring in yet another MMDE.