Historical Events  Movies
Historical Events  Movies

HE-1982-0187

Roy Batty

C-Beams and Orions Shoulder

MMDE: Like tears in the rain

Current: Like tears in rain

Ask most Blade Runner fans to quote Roy Battys famous dying monologue and they'll probably say "like tears in the rain". That's not the way it is seen today, however - it's "like tears in rain".

Based on Philip K Dicks "Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep?", the movie is legendary amongst Sci-fi fans and has a resurgence with the 30+ year long awaited sequel, Blade Runner 2049.

But the actual line? Perhaps Dekkard should wheel out his trusty Voight-Kampff machine...

Historical Events  Movies

HE-1960-0169

Moorlock

Another time travel Mandela Effect!

MMDE: Moorlocks were bright blue

Current: Moorlocks are pale blue

The number of movies about time travel which themselves feature Mandela Effects is getting crazy.

First we had the Back to the Future van change, then a few Terminator 2 ones as well as our old friend Dr Who.

Now it turns out there's one from the original - the 1960 adaptation of HG Wells "The Time machine". The monsters in that movie were called "Moorlocks" and many remember them appearing as bright blue with long white hair. Are they experiencing a Mandela Effect? This is because all references today show them as a pale blue, and nothing like as as one described as being the same shade as a smurf.

Historical Events  Movies

HE-1991-0146

Judgement/Judgment

Judge for yourself

Another Mandela Effect relating to the title of Arnie's Terminator 2!

Which of the titles in this image looks correct to you?

This is an unusual one because there is already a Mandela Effect associated with the title - it's the mysterious sloping "A", and as pointed out there, this, like the Back to the Future van change, is another movie featuring time travel which itself is a Mandela Effect.

Those experiencing the Mandela Effect are looking for patterns such as letter changes, or significant words (such as "judgement"), in signals such as time travel movies, with the idea these could all add up to some message we are all supposed to interpret...

Historical Events  Movies

HE-1991-0141

Terminator 2

Another time travel movie which itself is a Mandela Effect

Can you spot the difference between the two titles in this image?

A sloping "A" might seem trivial until you realise a few odd things connected to this. First, this is another film where time travel features as the main theme in the movie, and the movie itself is a Mandela Effect, just as in for example the Back to the Future terrorist van change.

The second strange thing about this is the residue. When you look at the original, as seen in the opening credits of the movie (you can't get more definitive than that!), you see the A is sloping to the left. Yet a Google search throws up many images showing that same title but with it sometimes sloping to the right, as well as to the left.

Finally, since this is a font change you'd have thought the creators of a font specifically made to match the movie would get it right - these are even called "terminator" fonts. Check the "A" on these:

Historical Events  Movies

HE-1956-0127

Cruella DeVille

Cruel devil

MMDE: Cruella DeVille

Current: Cruella De Vil

The villain in Disney's '101 Dalmations' had a name which was a clever play on words - Cruella De Vil. Or did she? Searches now find only references to Cruella DeVille, and many are putting this down to more than a false memory but a Mandela Effect.

Could this be caused by the fact she drove a DeVillle car in the movie? It had the license plate "DE VIL", so that doesn't really help settle things either way.

The movie was actually based on a book by Dodie Smith, and at the end Mr's Darling comments on how fitting her name is, because she really is a devil. Again, this just reinforces the play on the "devil" name either way, and doesn't help clear things up.

Historical Events  Movies

HE-1939-0120

Hanging Munchkin

Was it a bird, was it a Munchkin?

Another Wizard of Oz false memory?

Many people remember seeing something strange in the background hanging from a tree at the end of the Tin Man sequence. It looked like a Munchkin, and the story was this little fellow was one of the dwarf actors brought in who committed suicide after being rejected by another female dwarf who was also acting as a Munchkin.

The story gained prominence in an Irving Welsh (yes, of "Trainspotting" fame) play "Babylon Heights", which followed the livs of the real-life dwarfs recruited as Munchkin actors for the movie.

However the studio claims they brought in several large birds from a local zoo and allowed to wander around the fake forest, in order to give it a more realistic feel. Specifically, they claim it is a crane. Urban myth or alternative memory? You decide...

Historical Events  Movies

HE-1942-0119

Casablanca

The most famous movie line ever?

Ask anyone unfamiliar with this MMDE to quote a line from Casablanca and odds on they'll instantly reply with 'Play it again, Sam'. You guessed it - that's not in the movie, and never has been.

Starring Humphrey Bogart and Ingrid Bergman, Casablanca (1942) consistently ranks near the top of the list of the greatest films ever made.

Similar to the Beam me up, Scotty and Me Tarzan, you Jane etc memes, this particular misconception seems to arise when a short, memorable quote to sum up a powerful image of the story as a whole was provided, and it's inclusion in the production isn't actually necessary. It's a kind of single-phrase summary which becomes so associated with the story it ends up getting a life of its own.

Historical Events  Movies

HE-1871-0109

Tweedledee and Tweedledum

Crazy headgear - but what was it exactly?

MMDE: Propellers on their hats

Current: Flags on their hats

Tweedledee and Tweedledum first appeared in a poem by John Byrom, but were made much more famous in Lewis Caroll's Through the Looking-Glass and what Alice Found There - which is of course better known as Alice in Wonderland.

In the Disney Movie of 1951, they clearly have yellow flags on their hats, yet many people remember them as having propellers. There are plenty of references to them on the internet today, including artwork and costumes. Alice in Wonderland is the subject of other MMDE's, which is hardly suprising given the craziness in her world...

Historical Events  Movies

HE-1951-0104

Cheshire Cat

What did the Cheshire Cat say?

MMDE: We're all mad here

Current: Most everyone is mad here.

The mysterious Cheshire Cat is firmly lodged in many peoples memories having read about him, or equally likely seen him, in Lewis Carrols famous Alice in Wonderland.

In the Disney adaptation, many remember him saying "we're all mad here", and this phrase is referenced many times on the internet. It's this way in the original text, too. The problem is in the Disney movie, the phrase he uses is "Most everyone is mad here".

This Mass Memory Discrepancy Effect is likely explained by the phrase being different in the original, which is of course the authoritative source. However, it is remarkable just how many claim to have only seen the movie yet are sure they know the phrase.