Tongue taste map
05 Apr 2020
John Carpenter
18 Feb 2020
10,000 steps
02 Feb 2020
Historical Events  Brands
Chick-fil-a

Exactly how was it spelt?

MMDE: Chic-fil-a

Current: Chick-fil-a

Since its founding in 1946, Americans have loved the chicken sandwiches served by the famous chain known as Chick-fil-a. But wait - have they? Many are claiming the spelling was always Chic-fil-a and has been changed somehow by the Mass Memory Discrepancy Effect.

There is understandable confusion here. If you say both versions out loud, they are similar, although the correct pronunciation of "Chic" might well escape many. Furthermore, from a marketing point of view both have merits - one is merely stating what the product is, "Chick" short for "Chicken", and the other is a way of association the product with something that is seen as cool, i.e. "Chic".

Historical Events  Brands
Volvo logo

Did the Volvo logo change?

MMDE: No arrow

Current: Has an arrow pointing North East

Those apparently experiencing the Mass Memory Discrepancy Effect remember the Volvo symbol as a simple circle, yet all references to it today show the male "arrow" has been added pointing to the upper right hand corner.

The waters are muddied with this one. On their hubcaps, the logo didn't have the arrow until 2006.

It also is interesting to note the arrow is also the symbol for iron, so any kind of sexism reference might be misguided.

On a general point, arguing that companies tinker with their brand logos is always suspect. Volvo are over a hundred years old. Their instant brand recognition is of utmost importance to them, so claiming they changed their logo when it's been out there in the public consciousness for decades, without any major fanfare, is a lot to take in.

Historical Events  People
Gandhi

How was Mahatma's surname spelt?

MMDE: Mahatma Ghandi

Current: Mahatma Gandhi

There are a few references on the internet to Mahatma Ghandi, yet most references today spell his surname as Gandhi.

Is this the Mass Memory Discrepancy Effect in action or just a few instances of people being unsure hiw to spell it correctly so took their best guess?

The problem with the "simple misspelling" argument is that there really does appear to be many people who learned to spell it one way then suddenly, all within a short time span, all became aware they were "wrong" all along. If each individually were just correcting a lifelong misspelling, it would not happen to those experiencing it all at the same time. 

Historical Events  People
Charles Schulz

It's all in the spelling

MMDE: Charles Schultz

Current: Charles Schulz

Was the creator of the Charlie Brown cartoons called Charles Schulz or Charles Schultz? There appears to be a Mass Memory Discrepancy Effect at work here, because many people are remembering it as "Schultz" whereas searches today on the internet mostly turn up "Schulz", and claim it always has been this way.

With these spelling related issues it is always important to think about how people say the words too, since it would be easy to conflate the pronunciation with a particular spelling irrespective of whether it is correct or incorrect. Charles' surname would always appear awkward to his main audience of Americans and so it could well be just a simple case of people remembering a version of how it was pronounced as being that of how it was spelled too.

Or as Charlie Brown would say: "Good Grief!".

Historical Events  Movies
C3PO Silver leg

Don't blame me, I'm an interpreter.

MMDE: CP30 did not have a silver leg

Current: CP30 had a silver leg

This time it's C3PO's leg. Actually, in the 1977 Star Wars movie, the first to be produced, he's the very first character you see on screen and this effect is present right from the start.

In the films seen today, his right leg from the foot to the knee is silver, with the rest of his body being gold. Most people just remember him being gold all over and are quite surprised to find these are alternate memories when they see the silver leg since once it's pointed out to them.

This one is also backed up by the merchandise such as toys and posters, which also feature the silver leg, as well as related "guest" appearances such as at the Oscars. All show a silver leg, yet few people remember it.

The "official" explanation is that people didn't notice because it always reflected what was around it, such as the other leg or the desert, and since no explicit reference was made to it (it was intended to show he was battle scarred), it passed by largely unnoticed.

Historical Events  Movies
Sinbad Genie

Did Sinbad ever play a genie?

MMDE: Sinbad played a genie in Shazaam

Current: Sinbad did not play a genie in Shazaam

"Sinbad" - the stage name of the comedian David Adkins - certainly looks like he'd fit well in the part of a genie. Oddly enough, that's exactly what many people claim he did in the 90's and can even remember the movie, the posters for it and the clothes he wore. Yet it appears they are experiencing the Mass Memory Discrepancy Effect, because no such record of this exists today.

There have been many "Genie" movies and many actors associated with the role, such as Shaq, Kazaam etc.

Lots of people grew up watching Sinbad, so are very familiar with his work. Those that remember his genie role now find it has vanished as if in a puff of smoke, which is kind of appropriate in an ironic way.

Historical Events  TV
Beam me up Scotty

The most famous Star Trek catchphrase

MMDE: Kirk said "Beam me up, Scotty"

Current: Kirk never said "Beam me up, Scotty"

Did Kirk ever actually say "Beam me up, Scotty"?

Sometimes, the Mass Memory Discrepancy Effect works in "reverse", whereby most people are aware something is well known for not happening, yet many claim it actually did.

There is no record of Kirk ever actually saying "Beam me up, Scotty", although many parodies and anecdotes exist which only serve to ingrain this meme further into popular culture - even non-fans know this phrase.

It seems this one is illogical.

And we all know who we should consult about that ;-)