Historical Events  Movies
Star Wars

The Force is strong in this one

MMDE: Luke, I am your father

Current: No, I am your father

Star Wars is actually subject to a few Mass Memory Discrepancy Effects. The one discussed here concerns the famous line Darth Vader uses in Episode V when he tells Luke he is his father. In the original, did he say "Luke, I am your father" or "No, I am your father"? 

Many remember it as "Luke...", and that is the way it's been recorded in a few forms including a TV chat show with the voice of Darth Vader himself, James Earl Jones.

The problem is that all available versions of the movie show it as "No...". A small difference, but related to the whole Star Wars plot itself.

Historical Events  Movies
Mirror mirror

Did the movie change the line?

MMDE: Mirror, mirror

Current: Magic mirror

Pretty much everyone remembers the quote from Disneys 1937 classic "Snow White" as "Mirror, mirror on the wall..." but in the movie the line is actually "Magic mirror on the wall...".

It's referenced as "Mirror, mirror" in many places too - such as the Shrek movie, and there is even a movie actually titled "Mirror, mirror" too.

There could be an explanation for this one, however.

The movie Snow White was based on is the earlier Brothers Grimm fairy tale book in which it actually is written "Mirror, mirror...", so this line would have already been in the public consciousness by then, and Disney changing it at the time might not have been noticed.

Historical Events  Movies
Forrest Gump

What exactly did he say?

MMDE: Life is like a box of chocolates

Current: Life was like a box of chocolates

Ask anyone what Forrest Gumps most famous line is, and, assuming they aren't already aware of the controversy, chances are they would reply "My mom always said life IS like a box of chocolates". Play the movie today though, and he says "life WAS like a box of chocolates". It's a small point, but is having a big impact on those suffering from the Mass Memory Discrepancy Effect.

To complicate things, it appears there exist two versions of the original footage in which each of the different the lines were used. Since only one made it to the movie we see today, the "was" version, could it be the other one was somehow shown at the time? Even Tom Hanks has been caught saying "IS" in a subsequent TV skit he did years after the original.

Historical Events  Movies
Interview with the Vampire

One little word

MMDE: Interview with a Vampire

Current: Interview with the Vampire

The Mass Memory Discrepancy Effect applies to the 1976 novel by Anne Rice which was later made into a Hollywood movie starring Brad Pitt and Tom Cruise. Was it originally called "Interview with A Vampire" or "Interview with THE Vampire"? All references today show the latter, but many people are claiming the former.

The German version is still titled "Interview mit einem Vampir (Interview with a vampire)", so at least we have concrete evience today of there being an actual discrepancy. 

One supporting argument is that there are many vampires in the story, so theres no special reason to just single one out as the "the" version seems to.

Historical Events  Books
Berenstein/Berenstain Bears

Can we settle on Berenst#in?

MMDE: Berenstein Bears

Current: Berenstain Bears

Today, everywhere you look you see The Berenstain Bears are spelt that way - BerenstAin. Many people, however, are insistent that it was originally spelt BerentEin, so we have another Mass Memory Discrepancy Effect to consider.

For those wondering what the heck this is all about - never mind how they are spelt - The Berenstain Bears is a set of children's books originating in the early 1960's from Stan and Jan Berenstain.

The books became so popular that two TV series were launched, along with a range of merchandise and product licencing deals. Mike Berenstain took full authorship in 2012 following his father, Jan's, death.

Historical Events  People
Nelson Mandela

The reason for the "Mandela Effect" term

When Nelson Mandela's death in 2013 was announced some people were surprised. This is because they were sure he'd already died, and they even seem to remember where and when - in prison in the late 1980s. Individual people would have normally just dismissed this as something they didn't quite remember correctly. Maybe they misheard it wrong, or maybe it was someone else who died and for some reason they were sure it was Nelson.

Then - somehow - this notion started getting discussed on the internet and this began a stream of "me, too!" type responses. Once this number became too big to ignore, and those experiencing it were not just dismissing it as faulty memory, we had what became known as The Mandela Effect.