Historical Events  Brands
Krispy Kreme

A double MMDE!

MMDE: Crispy Creme

Current: Krispy Kreme

This is unusual - two Mass Memory Discrepancy Effects with the same brand!

First we have the people claiming it used to be spelt "Crispy Creme" but can't find any reference to that today, even though they swear it once was.

Then we have those who look closely at the logo and read it as "Kuspy Kreme". You can see why when you look at the logo - the typeface does lend itself to this reading. What is different is how it seems to suddenly jump out at people as "wrong", even though it can be shown as always having been that way right back to 1937.

Take at look again at the logo here - can you see "Kuspy Kreme"?

Historical Events  Movies
Man behind the curtain

Another Wizard of Oz MMDE!

MMDE: Pay no attention to THE man behind the curtain

Current: Pay no attention to THAT man behind the curtain

The Wizard of Oz must win the award for the most Mass Memory Discrepancy Effects!

At the end, (spoiler alert!), when finally confronting the fearsome Wizard, Dorothy's dog Toto pulls back a curtain to reveal a little man working some machinery. A voice booms out "Pay no attention to THAT man behind the curtain" - or was it "pay no attention to THE man behind the curtain"?

Today you'll only find "that" man is being said, but if you ask most people they'd say it was "the" man.

This is another meme - the phrase is often used to describe some kind of hidden controller in a general way, where some unseen hand is guiding things in, for example, fields such as politics or business. It's easy to see how it could have been changed this way when making the transition. In the Oz scene, he is physically present, so the more specific "that" is appropriate, whereas in the general meme the subject is unseen so "the" is better suited. Or is that what you're supposed to think? :-)

Historical Events  Movies
Tarzan and Jane

You Jane Me Tarzan

MMDE: "Me Tarzan, You Jane" was in the original Tarzan movies

Current: "Me Tarzan, You Jane" was not in the original Tarzan movies

Another popular misquote or the Mass Memory Discrepancy Effect in action?

The favourite schoolyard call "Me Tarzan, You Jane!" can't be found in any of the original Tarzan movies, nor in the books running right back to when he first appeared in "Tarzan of the Apes" in 1912. Yet this quote is as famous as the other "non-quote" people remember, "Beam me up Scotty". What is causing people to not only think they were present originally, but continue repeating them?

Once a phrase such as this, which almost seems trying to sum up the entire movie or series in one quick phrase, gets into the public consciousness, its appears for some of them there is no stopping them once they hit a critical point. They become a "meme" and gain a life of their own. It's as if the masses, who aren't hardcore fans, use it as this quick "summary" to the chagrin of that fewer group who actually to pay attention and realise their "mistake".

Historical Events  TV
The tail of Curious George

Did he ever have a tail?

MMDE: Curious George had a tail

Current: Curious George did not have a tail

Most people are surprised to learn Curious George first made an appearance in 1939.

Those experiencing the Mass Memory Discrepancy Effect are even more surprised to find no reference to his tail, which they are certain they remember him having whilst growing up watching him.

There's an issue over whether he is a monkey or an ape, because monkeys have tails and apes don't.

People are even reporting remembering stories actually involving his tail, such as him hanging from it whilst stealing bananas and getting ice cream on it, etc.

A curious tail indeed! 

Historical Events  Brands
Smokey "the" Bear

Only YOU can prevent forest fires

MMDE: Smokey the Bear

Current: Smokey Bear

Was he "Smokey Bear" or "Smokey the bear"?

Our lovable friend seems to have been on TV forever, and now on the internet in the form of ads, but every time you see him now he's just called Smokey Bear. Those experiencing the Mass memory Discrepancy Effect are sure this has changed, and remember him as "Smokey the Bear."

The popular song from 1952 has the word "the" added, but that might just be artistic licence in order to keep the rhythm going.

To anyone under 40 this seems to not be an issue - they remember it as wee see today, "Smokey Bear". There are one or two references still around to "the", however.

Historical Events  Brands
Chick-fil-a

Exactly how was it spelt?

MMDE: Chic-fil-a

Current: Chick-fil-a

Since its founding in 1946, Americans have loved the chicken sandwiches served by the famous chain known as Chick-fil-a. But wait - have they? Many are claiming the spelling was always Chic-fil-a and has been changed somehow by the Mass Memory Discrepancy Effect.

There is understandable confusion here. If you say both versions out loud, they are similar, although the correct pronunciation of "Chic" might well escape many. Furthermore, from a marketing point of view both have merits - one is merely stating what the product is, "Chick" short for "Chicken", and the other is a way of association the product with something that is seen as cool, i.e. "Chic".

Historical Events  Brands
Volvo logo

Did the Volvo logo change?

MMDE: No arrow

Current: Has an arrow pointing North East

Those apparently experiencing the Mass Memory Discrepancy Effect remember the Volvo symbol as a simple circle, yet all references to it today show the male "arrow" has been added pointing to the upper right hand corner.

The waters are muddied with this one. On their hubcaps, the logo doesn't have the arrow.

It also is interesting to note the arrow is also the symbol for iron, so any kind of sexism reference might be misguided.

On a general point, arguing that companies tinker with their brand logos is always suspect. Volvo are over a hundred years old. Their instant brand recognition is of utmost importance to them, so claiming they changed their logo when it's been out there in the public consciousness for decades, without any major fanfare, is a lot to take in.