Historical Events  Movies
You say tomato

No sunglasses in the dance scene?

Tom Cruise wore RayBans throughout the 80's movie Risky Business ... but not in the famous dance scene?

Those experiencing the Mandela Effect claim he definitely did, but if you watch the movie today he didn't.

This is one where there are many references - in the form of parodies/tributes etc - where all of them are wearing the trademark sunglasses. The photo's of Tom in the covers advertising the movie all show them, so could every single one of these just have misremembered this, having had the image of him wearing them throughout planted in their memories?

See for yourself in the video - sure, he has no trousers on, but no sunglasses?

Historical Events  Brands
KitKat

Dash or no dash?

MMDE: Kit-Kat

Current: Kit Kat

Few people realise the name name "Kit Kat" or "Kit Cat" for a type of food goes back to the 18th century, when mutton pies known as a Kit-Kat were served at meetings of the political Kit-Cat Club in London.

It seems the popular chocolate bar took its name from this, which definitely had a dash in when used by the Kit-Cat club. Those experiencing the Mass Memory Discrepancy Effect say they too remember the dash in the chocolate snack's name years ago, but today it has none and no references to the version with the dash ever existing can be found.

Time for a break?

Historical Events  Music
Bob Holness

Everyone knows he didn't - don't they?

MMDE: Bob Holness played the sax on Baker Street

Current: Bob Holness did not play the sax on Baker Street

This is the Mass Memory Discrepancy Effect working in reverse - a popular urban myth which everyone knows about but still perpetuates.

Bob Holness was the presenter of the popular UK TV programme "Blockbusters". A straight up guy you'd never associate with the sleazy fantastic sax work on Gerry Raffertys 1978 hit "Baker Street".

This one also has nothing to hide - even it's orgin is well documented. The sax was played by Raphael Ravenscroft and the idea Bob played it originated as a joke in the NME music magazine in 1990.

There is an interesting point if you really want to catch people out though. Bob Holness was the second actor to play James Bond. This was on the radio in the 1950's. Allegedly. 

Historical Events  Brands
Krispy Kreme

A double MMDE!

MMDE: Crispy Creme

Current: Krispy Kreme

This is unusual - two Mass Memory Discrepancy Effects with the same brand!

First we have the people claiming it used to be spelt "Crispy Creme" but can't find any reference to that today, even though they swear it once was.

Then we have those who look closely at the logo and read it as "Kuspy Kreme". You can see why when you look at the logo - the typeface does lend itself to this reading. What is different is how it seems to suddenly jump out at people as "wrong", even though it can be shown as always having been that way right back to 1937.

Take at look again at the logo here - can you see "Kuspy Kreme"?

Historical Events  Movies
Man behind the curtain

Another Wizard of Oz MMDE!

MMDE: Pay no attention to THE man behind the curtain

Current: Pay no attention to THAT man behind the curtain

The Wizard of Oz must win the award for the most Mass Memory Discrepancy Effects!

At the end, (spoiler alert!), when finally confronting the fearsome Wizard, Dorothy's dog Toto pulls back a curtain to reveal a little man working some machinery. A voice booms out "Pay no attention to THAT man behind the curtain" - or was it "pay no attention to THE man behind the curtain"?

Today you'll only find "that" man is being said, but if you ask most people they'd say it was "the" man.

This is another meme - the phrase is often used to describe some kind of hidden controller in a general way, where some unseen hand is guiding things in, for example, fields such as politics or business. It's easy to see how it could have been changed this way when making the transition. In the Oz scene, he is physically present, so the more specific "that" is appropriate, whereas in the general meme the subject is unseen so "the" is better suited. Or is that what you're supposed to think? :-)

Historical Events  Movies
Tarzan and Jane

You Jane Me Tarzan

MMDE: "Me Tarzan, You Jane" was in the original Tarzan movies

Current: "Me Tarzan, You Jane" was not in the original Tarzan movies

Another popular misquote or the Mass Memory Discrepancy Effect in action?

The favourite schoolyard call "Me Tarzan, You Jane!" can't be found in any of the original Tarzan movies, nor in the books running right back to when he first appeared in "Tarzan of the Apes" in 1912. Yet this quote is as famous as the other "non-quote" people remember, "Beam me up Scotty". What is causing people to not only think they were present originally, but continue repeating them?

Once a phrase such as this, which almost seems trying to sum up the entire movie or series in one quick phrase, gets into the public consciousness, its appears for some of them there is no stopping them once they hit a critical point. They become a "meme" and gain a life of their own. It's as if the masses, who aren't hardcore fans, use it as this quick "summary" to the chagrin of that fewer group who actually to pay attention and realise their "mistake".

Historical Events  TV
The tail of Curious George

Did he ever have a tail?

MMDE: Curious George had a tail

Current: Curious George did not have a tail

Most people are surprised to learn Curious George first made an appearance in 1939.

Those experiencing the Mass Memory Discrepancy Effect are even more surprised to find no reference to his tail, which they are certain they remember him having whilst growing up watching him.

There's an issue over whether he is a monkey or an ape, because monkeys have tails and apes don't.

People are even reporting remembering stories actually involving his tail, such as him hanging from it whilst stealing bananas and getting ice cream on it, etc.

A curious tail indeed!